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Various Artists – The Monterey International Pop Festival

The Monterey International Pop Music Festival was a three-day concert event held June 16 to June 18, 1967 at the Monterey County Fairgrounds in Monterey, California. Monterey was the first widely promoted and heavily attended rock festival, attracting an estimated 55,000 total attendees with up to 90,000 people present at the event’s peak at midnight on Sunday.

The festival is remembered for the first major American appearances by Jimi Hendrix, The Who and Ravi Shankar, the first large scale public performance of Janis Joplin, and the introduction of Otis Redding to a large, predominantly white audience.

The Monterey Pop Festival embodied the themes of California as a focal point for the counterculture and is generally regarded as one of the beginnings of the “Summer of Love” in 1967, along with the Fantasy Fair and Magic Mountain Music Festival held at Mount Tamalpais in Marin County a week earlier. Monterey became the template for future music festivals, notably the Woodstock Festival two years later.

The Festival

The festival was planned in seven weeks by promoter Lou Adler, John Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas, producer Alan Pariser, and publicist Derek Taylor. The Monterey location had been known as the site for the long-running Monterey Jazz Festival and Monterey Folk Festival; the promoters saw the Monterey Pop festival as a way to validate rock music as an art form in the way jazz and folk were regarded. The organizers succeeded beyond all expectations, especially since the total number of attendees who could witness the legendary musical performances at any one time inside the enclosed concert arena was less than 7,000.

The artists performed for free with all revenue donated to charity, except for Ravi Shankar, who was paid $3,000 for his afternoon-long performance on the sitar. Country Joe and the Fish were paid $5,000 not by the festival itself, but from revenue generated from the D.A. Pennebaker documentary.

Lou Adler later reflected:

…[O]ur idea for Monterey was to provide the best of everything — sound equipment, sleeping and eating accommodations, transportation — services that had never been provided for the artist before Monterey…
We set up an on-site first aid clinic, because we knew there would be a need for medical supervision and that we would encounter drug-related problems. We didn’t want people who got themselves into trouble and needed medical attention to go untreated. Nor did we want their problems to ruin or in any way disturb other people or disrupt the music…
Our security worked with the Monterey police. The local law enforcement authorities never expected to like the people they came in contact with as much as they did. They never expected the spirit of ‘Music, Love and Flowers’ to take over to the point where they’d allow themselves to be festooned with flowers.
Monterey’s bill boasted a line-up that put established stars like The Mamas and the Papas, Simon & Garfunkel and The Byrds alongside groundbreaking new acts from the UK and the USA.

Performances

Jefferson Airplane

With two huge singles behind them, the Airplane was one of the major attractions of the festival.

The Who

Although already a big act in the UK, and now gaining some attention in the US after playing some New York dates two months earlier, The Who were propelled into the American mainstream at Monterey. The band used rented Vox amps for their set, which were not as powerful as their regular Sound City amps which they had left in England to save shipping costs. At the end of their frenetic performance of “My Generation”, the audience were stunned as guitarist Pete Townshend smashed his guitar, smoke bombs exploded behind the amps and frightened concert staff rushing onstage to scurry expensive microphones to safety. At the end of the mayhem, drummer Keith Moon kicked over his drum kit as the band exited the stage. The Who, after winning a coin toss, performed before Jimi Hendrix, as Townshend and Hendrix each refused to go on after the other – both having planned an instrument-demolishing conclusion to their respective sets.

The Jimi Hendrix Experience

Hendrix ended his Monterey performance with an unpredictable version of “Wild Thing”, which he capped by kneeling over his guitar, pouring lighter fluid over it, setting it aflame, and then smashing it in to the stage seven times before throwing its remains into the audience. This produced unforeseen sounds and these actions contributed to his rising popularity in the United States.

Janis Joplin

Monterey Pop was also one of the earliest major public performances for Janis Joplin, who appeared as a member of Big Brother and The Holding Company. Joplin was seen swigging from a bottle of Southern Comfort as she gave a provocative rendition of the song “Ball ‘n’ Chain”. Columbia Records signed Big Brother and The Holding Company on the basis of their performance at Monterey.

Otis Redding

Redding, backed by Booker T. & The MG’s, was included on the bill through the efforts of promoter Jerry Wexler, who saw the festival as an opportunity to advance Redding’s career. Up until that point, Redding had performed mainly for black audiences, besides a few successful shows at the Whisky a Go Go. Redding’s show, received well by the audience (“there is certainly more audible crowd participation in Redding’s set than in any of the others filmed by Pennebaker that weekend”) included “Respect” and a version of “Satisfaction”. The festival would be one of his last major performances. He died 6 months later in a plane crash at the age of 26.

Ravi Shankar

Ravi Shankar was another artist who was introduced to America at the Monterey festival. The Raga Dhun (Dadra and Fast Teental) (which was later miscredited as “Raga Bhimpalasi”) an excerpt from Shankar’s four-hour performance at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, concluded the Monterey Pop film, introducing the artist to a new generation of music fans.

Track Listing

Disc: 1
1. Festival Introduction
2. Along Comes Mary
3. Windy
4. Love Is a Hurtin’ Thing
5. Dead End Street
6. Tobacco Road
7. San Franciscan Nights
8. Hey Gyp (Dig the Slowness)
9. Rollin’ and Tumblin’
10. Dust My Broom
11. Bullfrog Blues
12. Not So Sweet Martha Lorraine
13. Down on Me
14. Combination of the Two
15. Harry
16. Road Block
17. Ball and Chain

Disk 1 – https://rapidshare.com/files/1161241451/Monterey-cd1.zip

Disc: 2
1. Look Over Yonders Wall
2. Mystery Train
3. Born in Chicago
4. Double Trouble
5. Mary Ann
6. Mercury Blues
7. Groovin’ Is Easy
8. Wine
9. Bajabula Bonke (The Healing Song)
10. Renaissance Fair
11. Have You Seen Her Face
12. Hey Joe
13. He Was a Friend of Mine
14. Lady Friend
15. Chimes of Freedom
16. So You Want to Be a Rock & Roll Star
17. Dhun: Fast Teental [Excerpt]
18. The Flute Thing

Disk 2 – https://rapidshare.com/files/51252590/Monterey-cd2.zip

Disc: 3
1. Somebody to Love
2. The Other Side of This Life
3. White Rabbit
4. High Flyin’ Bird
5. She Has Funny Cars
6. Booker-Loo
7. Hip Hug-Her
8. Philly Dog
9. Shake
10. Respect
11. I’ve Been Loving You Too Long
12. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
13. Try a Little Tenderness
14. Substitute
15. Summertime Blues
16. Pictures of Lily
17. A Quick One, While He’s Away
18. Happy Jack
19. My Generation

Disk 3 – https://rapidshare.com/files/2703482566/Monterey-cd3.zip

Disc: 4
1. Killing Floor
2. Foxey Lady
3. Like a Rolling Stone
4. Rock Me Baby
5. Hey Joe
6. Can You See Me
7. The Wind Cries Mary
8. Purple Haze
9. Wild Thing
10. Straight Shooter
11. Got a Feelin’
12. California Dreamin’
13. I Call Your Name
14. Monday, Monday
15. San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)
16. Dancing in the Street

Download – https://rapidshare.com/files/1336668187/Monterey-cd4.zip

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